Synchronicity – A Fluxus Score

“Synchronicity”

A Fluxus Score by Christopher C. Odom

Perform with a Timekeeper plus 2 to 7 additional Participants. Requires a timer and a blank TV screen or monitor. Perform score for 3 minutes and 14 seconds.

BEGIN SCORE.

Timekeeper

Say, “Synchronicity.” Start timer. Say, “0 minutes.”

At 2 minutes, say, “2 Minutes.”

At 3 minutes and 4 seconds, say, “Synchronicity.”

Participant 1

Exercise.

At 1 minute and 58 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 36 seconds, exercise.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 2

Talk.

At 2 minutes and 2 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 40 seconds, talk.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 3

Laugh.

At 2 minutes and 6 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 44 seconds, laugh.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 4

Relax.

At 2 minutes and 10 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 48 seconds, relax.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 5

Sell.

At 2 minutes and 14 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 52 seconds, sell.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 6

Beg.

At 2 minutes and 18 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 2 minutes and 56 seconds, beg.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

Participant 7

Pray.

At 2 minutes and 22 seconds, stop. Stare at the TV screen, silent.

At 3 minutes, pray.

At 3 minutes and 14 seconds, stop.

END SCORE.

Timeline

0:00 – 1:48 – Participants synchronize.

1:58 – Participant 1 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:02 – Participant 2 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:06 – Participant 3 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:10 – Participant 4 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:14 – Participant 5 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:18 – Participant 6 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:22 – Participant 7 stops. Stares at TV screen, silent.

2:26 – Silence

2:36 – Participant 1 resynchronizes

2:40 – Participant 2 resynchronizes

2:44 – Participant 3 resynchronizes

2:48 – Participant 4 resynchronizes

2:52 – Participant 5 resynchronizes

2:56 – Participant 6 resynchronizes

3:00 – Participant 7 resynchronizes

3:04 – Full Resynchronization

3:14 – END SCORE

Composer Notes

The goal of the score is for both the audience and participants to experience synchronicity and resynchronization.

The score was inspired by the events of 9/11 in the United States when terrorists used 2 planes to crash into each of the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York city and ultimately destroy them. “Synchronicity” is a metaphor for the synchronicity we experience in our lives with our routines and the moment. However, sometimes an event can become a phenomenon, meaning public awareness spreads exponentially in a very compressed amount of time, which results in a cultural synchronicity with the moment. Once synchronicity has occurred, we eventually resynchronize back to our routines and our new moment at hand. The actions of the the score’s participants represent what the passengers and people across the country may have been doing during their daily routines before the terrorists hijacked the two planes that crashed into the World Trade Center.

To score “Synchronicity,” I created a timeline in order to evenly space time intervals for the turning points of each participant. I wanted the score to pop with energy and 5 second intervals felt to long, while 3 second intervals felt too short. So I chose 4 second intervals. For the silence, I wanted it to be uncomfortable, but not longer than necessary. 7 seconds felt like enough to create a moment of silence, so I chose 10 seconds so it would be just beyond the cusp of discomfort.

Having a test run of the score proved to be an effective exercise. Rather than adjust my timings, I now realize the score needs to be performed with 8 participants as originally imagined. It will add to the organized symphony of chaos, spacing the beginnings and the endings of the participants more evenly, and reduce the long silence towards the end. I’m looking forward to the next performance of “Synchronicity” with a full ensemble.

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